Show simple item record

dc.creatorFatić, Aleksandar
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-02T11:26:32Z
dc.date.available2018-10-02T11:26:32Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.isbn9781317590552
dc.identifier.urihttp://rifdt.instifdt.bg.ac.rs/123456789/1801
dc.description.abstractThe focus of this chapter is on the argument that the use of intelligence in security policy is rarely predicated upon the need to find out the truth about events (and much less any comprehensive truth about the conflict that intelligence collection arises from or is intended to prevent). It is, rather, predicated upon a rights game, where the protection of a set of rights (arising from sovereignty, citizenship or other forms of belonging to a political or moral community) is the real objective. Such a shift in focus, from finding out the truth to using what appears to be the truth in order to advance competing sets of rights, allows controversial methods of intelligence collection, processing and operational use to purport to a moral justification where, if the focus was the truth, no such justification would be possible. This chapter thus deals with an epistemology of intelligence ethics, showing that such ethics will depend on the type of epistemology projected onto intelligence work. The chapter argues that any type of intelligence is best understood as a quasi-epistemic game, rather than a truth-driven process that is subject to a morality dictated by a truth-driven epistemology. This has significant consequences for the professional ethics of intelligence work, as well as for the status of intelligence in the security policy of a democratic state.sr
dc.language.isoensr
dc.publisherAbingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY : Routledge is an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa businesssr
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/MESTD/Basic Research (BR or ON)/179049/RS//sr
dc.rightsrestrictedAccesssr
dc.sourceEthics and the future of spying : technology, national security and intelligence collectionsr
dc.subjectepistemologysr
dc.subjectintelligencesr
dc.subjectethicssr
dc.subjectquasi-epistemic gamessr
dc.subjecttruth-driven epistemologysr
dc.titleThe epistemology of intelligence ethicssr
dc.typebookPartsr
dc.rights.licenseBYsr
dcterms.abstractФатиц, Aлександар;
dc.citation.spage39
dc.citation.epage52
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionsr


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record