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dc.contributorDeretić, Irina
dc.contributorSorgner, Stefan Lorenz
dc.creatorPredrag, Milidrag
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-25T12:40:11Z
dc.date.available2018-03-25T12:40:11Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.isbn10: 3631662580
dc.identifier.isbn13: 978-3631662588
dc.identifier.urihttp://rifdt.instifdt.bg.ac.rs/123456789/1486
dc.description.abstractThere are traces of very diverse Eastern and Western lines of thought in The Matrix Trilogy2, which speaks eloquently about its richness of ideas. Being ‘philosophical’ The Matrix Trilogy is not a boring film and long-winded; instead of talking endlessly, the characters are working ceaselessly, and that work is changing them. In this paper, I will try to interpret the changes in the main character, Neo, against the background of some classic ideas about the human being in Western philosophy. The main theses of this text are the following: In The Matrix Trilogy, Platonist, Cartesian and Hegelian ideas about man are clearly recognizable. On their general plain, plots of the films express movement (progress?) from Plato via Descartes to Hegel3 – and further.en
dc.language.isoensr
dc.rightsopenAccesssr
dc.sourceFrom Humanism to Meta-, Post- and Transhumanism?sr
dc.subjectHegelsr
dc.subjectDescartessr
dc.subjectPlatonsr
dc.subjectMatrix Trilogysr
dc.subjectMarxsr
dc.titlePost-humanism of The Matrix Trilogyen
dc.typebookPartsr
dc.rights.licenseBYsr
dcterms.abstractПредраг, Милидраг;
dc.citation.spage307
dc.citation.epage320
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionsr
dc.identifier.fulltexthttp://rifdt.instifdt.bg.ac.rs/bitstream/id/2983/Post-humanism.pdf


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