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Memoli, Vincenzo

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Author's Bibliography

Improving the Quality of Democracy: The case of Deliberative Poll held in 2007 in Turin

Fiket, Irena; Memoli, Vincenzo

(Berlin; Toronto : Barbara Budrich Publishers Opladen , 2013)

TY  - CHAP
AU  - Fiket, Irena
AU  - Memoli, Vincenzo
PY  - 2013
UR  - https://shop.budrich-academic.de/product/participatory-democratic-innovations-in-europe/?lang=en&v=8cee5050eeb7
UR  - http://rifdt.instifdt.bg.ac.rs/123456789/1740
AB  - In our study, we will evaluate the case of Deliberative Polling that took
place in Turin in 2007 in order to understand, whether the Deliberative Poll
could satisfy the democratic criteria outlined in the volume’s framework.
Many empirical studies have explored the effects of deliberation using the
deliberative poll, confirming that participation in deliberation produces different
“democratic” effects: political sophistication, political interest, internal political
efficacy, political trust, political “respect”, political empathy, “sociotropism”
and more positive attitudes toward the political system (Luskin and
Fishkin, 2002, Fishkin 2009, Mansbridge, 2010). Although the main idea on
which deliberative experiments are based is that discussion and deliberation
have a positive effect both on the health of democracy and the citizens involved
in the deliberations, the main focus of empirical research remains primarily
concerned with understanding the effects of deliberation on citizens'
opinions about the issue at hand.
This chapter will follow the analytical framework outlined by the editors.
In order to explore the effects of deliberative poll on the quality of democracy,
it will cover all of the evaluation areas outlined by the framework except the
one on effectiveness. Additionally, using previous analyses of Deliberative Poll
outputs, this study will analyse the perceived legitimacy of the process through
different phases of DP. The results from previous DPs have already offered
some support for the idea that deliberation makes citizens more supportive of
the democratic system (Luskin and Fishkin, 2002). The novelty of our research
is the use of the indicator of citizens' assessment of how well democracy works
– an indicator already used in quality of democracy studies – and to assess how
it changes through different experimental phases of DP. In this way, we hope
to understand not only whether the citizens would become more supportive of
the political system, we also hope to learn which phase has the strongest effect
on this support. We expect that during the phase in which citizens interact withpoliticians they will develop a better understanding of the political process and
thus, increase their satisfaction with democracy.
First, we will briefly describe the Deliberative Polling experiment that took
place in Turin.
PB  - Berlin; Toronto : Barbara Budrich Publishers Opladen 
T2  - Participatory Democratic Innovations in Europe. Improving the Quality of Democracy?
T1  - Improving the Quality of Democracy: The case of Deliberative Poll held in 2007 in Turin
SP  - 123
EP  - 143
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Fiket, Irena and Memoli, Vincenzo",
year = "2013",
url = "https://shop.budrich-academic.de/product/participatory-democratic-innovations-in-europe/?lang=en&v=8cee5050eeb7, http://rifdt.instifdt.bg.ac.rs/123456789/1740",
abstract = "In our study, we will evaluate the case of Deliberative Polling that took
place in Turin in 2007 in order to understand, whether the Deliberative Poll
could satisfy the democratic criteria outlined in the volume’s framework.
Many empirical studies have explored the effects of deliberation using the
deliberative poll, confirming that participation in deliberation produces different
“democratic” effects: political sophistication, political interest, internal political
efficacy, political trust, political “respect”, political empathy, “sociotropism”
and more positive attitudes toward the political system (Luskin and
Fishkin, 2002, Fishkin 2009, Mansbridge, 2010). Although the main idea on
which deliberative experiments are based is that discussion and deliberation
have a positive effect both on the health of democracy and the citizens involved
in the deliberations, the main focus of empirical research remains primarily
concerned with understanding the effects of deliberation on citizens'
opinions about the issue at hand.
This chapter will follow the analytical framework outlined by the editors.
In order to explore the effects of deliberative poll on the quality of democracy,
it will cover all of the evaluation areas outlined by the framework except the
one on effectiveness. Additionally, using previous analyses of Deliberative Poll
outputs, this study will analyse the perceived legitimacy of the process through
different phases of DP. The results from previous DPs have already offered
some support for the idea that deliberation makes citizens more supportive of
the democratic system (Luskin and Fishkin, 2002). The novelty of our research
is the use of the indicator of citizens' assessment of how well democracy works
– an indicator already used in quality of democracy studies – and to assess how
it changes through different experimental phases of DP. In this way, we hope
to understand not only whether the citizens would become more supportive of
the political system, we also hope to learn which phase has the strongest effect
on this support. We expect that during the phase in which citizens interact withpoliticians they will develop a better understanding of the political process and
thus, increase their satisfaction with democracy.
First, we will briefly describe the Deliberative Polling experiment that took
place in Turin.",
publisher = "Berlin; Toronto : Barbara Budrich Publishers Opladen ",
journal = "Participatory Democratic Innovations in Europe. Improving the Quality of Democracy?",
title = "Improving the Quality of Democracy: The case of Deliberative Poll held in 2007 in Turin",
pages = "123-143"
}
Fiket, I.,& Memoli, V. (2013). Improving the Quality of Democracy: The case of Deliberative Poll held in 2007 in Turin.
Participatory Democratic Innovations in Europe. Improving the Quality of Democracy?Berlin; Toronto : Barbara Budrich Publishers Opladen ., 123-143.
Fiket I, Memoli V. Improving the Quality of Democracy: The case of Deliberative Poll held in 2007 in Turin. Participatory Democratic Innovations in Europe. Improving the Quality of Democracy?. 2013;:123-143
Fiket Irena, Memoli Vincenzo, "Improving the Quality of Democracy: The case of Deliberative Poll held in 2007 in Turin" (2013):123-143

Supporting Democracy in Austria and Europe: Improving Democracy through Popular Deliberation’

Fiket, Irena; Memoli, Vincenzo

(2012)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Fiket, Irena
AU  - Memoli, Vincenzo
PY  - 2012
UR  - https://fedora.phaidra.univie.ac.at/fedora/get/o:107220/bdef:Content/get
UR  - http://rifdt.instifdt.bg.ac.rs/123456789/1743
AB  - Beginning with the Trilateral Commission report in 1975, recent studies have
demonstrated increasing dissatisfaction with the performance of democracies across Europe
(Crozier, et al. 1975). Citizens have become increasingly mistrustful of politicians, skeptical
about institutions, and disenchanted with the effectiveness of the democratic process
(Dalton, 2004). Recent longitudinal studies, analyzing satisfaction with democracy of
European citizens showed that in many European countries satisfaction with national
democracies flourishes and increases in time (see Wagner et al. 2009, Bellucci et al. 2012). At
the same time, the scientific has been characterized by the development of different
theoretical perspectives that all utilize different approaches in order to define and explain
support for democracy. We will first attempt to understand what citizens effectively support
when they say that they support “democracy.”
In order to answer this question, we will briefly review the literature on popular support for
democracy and then empirically explore the main theoretical model adopted in support for
democracy studies in order to understand if it still explains today'ʹs empirical reality of
Europe. In the second section we will try to assess where each European country is placed on
key dimensions of support for democracy. In that way, we will be able to see where Austria
stands within the European family in terms of support for democracy. Our third section
explores the possibility of deliberative mini publics to improve popular support for
democracy. The data we will analyze are produced by a deliberative poll experiment,
EuroPolis, which took place in 2009 and involved random sample of European citizens. We
seek to understand not only whether the citizens could become more supportive of the
political system, after participating in deliberative process, as assumed by deliberative model
of democracy, we also aim to learn something about the differences between the Austrian
and European sample.
T2  - Innovative democracy
T1  - Supporting Democracy in Austria and Europe: Improving Democracy through Popular Deliberation’
IS  - 1
VL  - 1
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Fiket, Irena and Memoli, Vincenzo",
year = "2012",
url = "https://fedora.phaidra.univie.ac.at/fedora/get/o:107220/bdef:Content/get, http://rifdt.instifdt.bg.ac.rs/123456789/1743",
abstract = "Beginning with the Trilateral Commission report in 1975, recent studies have
demonstrated increasing dissatisfaction with the performance of democracies across Europe
(Crozier, et al. 1975). Citizens have become increasingly mistrustful of politicians, skeptical
about institutions, and disenchanted with the effectiveness of the democratic process
(Dalton, 2004). Recent longitudinal studies, analyzing satisfaction with democracy of
European citizens showed that in many European countries satisfaction with national
democracies flourishes and increases in time (see Wagner et al. 2009, Bellucci et al. 2012). At
the same time, the scientific has been characterized by the development of different
theoretical perspectives that all utilize different approaches in order to define and explain
support for democracy. We will first attempt to understand what citizens effectively support
when they say that they support “democracy.”
In order to answer this question, we will briefly review the literature on popular support for
democracy and then empirically explore the main theoretical model adopted in support for
democracy studies in order to understand if it still explains today'ʹs empirical reality of
Europe. In the second section we will try to assess where each European country is placed on
key dimensions of support for democracy. In that way, we will be able to see where Austria
stands within the European family in terms of support for democracy. Our third section
explores the possibility of deliberative mini publics to improve popular support for
democracy. The data we will analyze are produced by a deliberative poll experiment,
EuroPolis, which took place in 2009 and involved random sample of European citizens. We
seek to understand not only whether the citizens could become more supportive of the
political system, after participating in deliberative process, as assumed by deliberative model
of democracy, we also aim to learn something about the differences between the Austrian
and European sample.",
journal = "Innovative democracy",
title = "Supporting Democracy in Austria and Europe: Improving Democracy through Popular Deliberation’",
number = "1",
volume = "1"
}
Fiket, I.,& Memoli, V. (2012). Supporting Democracy in Austria and Europe: Improving Democracy through Popular Deliberation’.
Innovative democracy, 1(1).
Fiket I, Memoli V. Supporting Democracy in Austria and Europe: Improving Democracy through Popular Deliberation’. Innovative democracy. 2012;1(1)
Fiket Irena, Memoli Vincenzo, "Supporting Democracy in Austria and Europe: Improving Democracy through Popular Deliberation’" 1, no. 1 (2012)