Pantović, Ljiljana

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orcid::0000-0002-2018-9643
  • Pantović, Ljiljana (2)
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Author's Bibliography

Private within the Public: Negotiating Birth in Serbia

Pantović, Ljiljana

(2019)

TY  - THES
AU  - Pantović, Ljiljana
PY  - 2019
UR  - http://rifdt.instifdt.bg.ac.rs/123456789/2198
AB  - This dissertation is about trust, authority, social personhood, and the importance of everyday negotiations that take place within a shifting health care landscape. Specifically, this was an ethnographic inquiry, grounded on twelve months of fieldwork, of how maternal care is provided in a low-income Eastern European country, Serbia. Maternal care is the case study for understanding how the previously exclusively public health care system is slowly unbundling along the seams of the different levels of care and thus opening new avenues for interventions by the private sector. While previous studies focused on the civil sector and informal economy, private medical sector has been an invisible avenue in the studies of informality. The private sector is not just reserved for elites, nor has it, as some scholars of Eastern European public health predicted, ended informal economies such as those expressed through the concept of “connections” (veze).
The starting point in this dissertation was the concept of “negotiating,” as a signal for looking at the practices and intersections of seemingly fixed dimensions, such as private and public, formal and informal, trust and mistrust; and how through the articulation of these seemingly fixed binaries we gain insight into how a health care system actually works. I looked at the sites of negotiations to understand the importance of sociality and social personhood within health care systems thus demonstrating that while the public health care system is being disarticulated in segments, neoliberal reforms are not replacing them but reconfiguring them. The selective privatization of maternal care has generated new avenues for (re)negotiating trust and authority between patients and providers, and thus contributed to reshaping the health care landscape. My work shows how patients and medical providers, in different but mutually congruent ways, leverage the emerging private medical sector as brokering strategies with and within the public health institutions.
T2  - http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/35994/
T1  - Private within the Public: Negotiating Birth in Serbia
ER  - 
@phdthesis{
author = "Pantović, Ljiljana",
year = "2019",
abstract = "This dissertation is about trust, authority, social personhood, and the importance of everyday negotiations that take place within a shifting health care landscape. Specifically, this was an ethnographic inquiry, grounded on twelve months of fieldwork, of how maternal care is provided in a low-income Eastern European country, Serbia. Maternal care is the case study for understanding how the previously exclusively public health care system is slowly unbundling along the seams of the different levels of care and thus opening new avenues for interventions by the private sector. While previous studies focused on the civil sector and informal economy, private medical sector has been an invisible avenue in the studies of informality. The private sector is not just reserved for elites, nor has it, as some scholars of Eastern European public health predicted, ended informal economies such as those expressed through the concept of “connections” (veze).
The starting point in this dissertation was the concept of “negotiating,” as a signal for looking at the practices and intersections of seemingly fixed dimensions, such as private and public, formal and informal, trust and mistrust; and how through the articulation of these seemingly fixed binaries we gain insight into how a health care system actually works. I looked at the sites of negotiations to understand the importance of sociality and social personhood within health care systems thus demonstrating that while the public health care system is being disarticulated in segments, neoliberal reforms are not replacing them but reconfiguring them. The selective privatization of maternal care has generated new avenues for (re)negotiating trust and authority between patients and providers, and thus contributed to reshaping the health care landscape. My work shows how patients and medical providers, in different but mutually congruent ways, leverage the emerging private medical sector as brokering strategies with and within the public health institutions.",
journal = "http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/35994/",
title = "Private within the Public: Negotiating Birth in Serbia"
}
Pantović, L.. (2019). Private within the Public: Negotiating Birth in Serbia. in http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/35994/.
Pantović L. Private within the Public: Negotiating Birth in Serbia. in http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/35994/. 2019;..
Pantović, Ljiljana, "Private within the Public: Negotiating Birth in Serbia" in http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/35994/ (2019).

Not-So-Informal Relationships. Selective Unbundling of Maternal Care and the Reconfigurations of Patient–Provider Relations in Serbia

Pantović, Ljiljana

(De Gruyter, 2018)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Pantović, Ljiljana
PY  - 2018
UR  - http://rifdt.instifdt.bg.ac.rs/123456789/2197
AB  - Social practices, such as connections (veze) and gift giving, are often labelled as socialist legacies that lead to corruption and are contrary to the establishment of market practices in postsocialist societies. This paper investigates the effects of the selective opening of aspects of maternal care to market practices on patient–provider relationships. Ethnographic research indicates that doctors are navigating between the constraints and opportunities afforded by both sectors, private and public, to negotiate their daily interactions with patients. In the attempt to maintain both authority and trust with their patients in a very precarious economic and social context, doctors have to be both medical experts and entrepreneurs. This practice points towards the conclusion that it may not be the legacies of socialism that have created the need for finding new ways of forging connections between medical providers and their patients, but rather the unbundling of socialist healthcare into the market.
PB  - De Gruyter
T2  - Südosteuropa. Journal of Politics and Society
T1  - Not-So-Informal Relationships. Selective Unbundling of Maternal Care and the  Reconfigurations of Patient–Provider Relations in Serbia
IS  - 3
VL  - 66
SP  - 371
EP  - 391
DO  - 10.1515/soeu-2018-0029
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Pantović, Ljiljana",
year = "2018",
abstract = "Social practices, such as connections (veze) and gift giving, are often labelled as socialist legacies that lead to corruption and are contrary to the establishment of market practices in postsocialist societies. This paper investigates the effects of the selective opening of aspects of maternal care to market practices on patient–provider relationships. Ethnographic research indicates that doctors are navigating between the constraints and opportunities afforded by both sectors, private and public, to negotiate their daily interactions with patients. In the attempt to maintain both authority and trust with their patients in a very precarious economic and social context, doctors have to be both medical experts and entrepreneurs. This practice points towards the conclusion that it may not be the legacies of socialism that have created the need for finding new ways of forging connections between medical providers and their patients, but rather the unbundling of socialist healthcare into the market.",
publisher = "De Gruyter",
journal = "Südosteuropa. Journal of Politics and Society",
title = "Not-So-Informal Relationships. Selective Unbundling of Maternal Care and the  Reconfigurations of Patient–Provider Relations in Serbia",
number = "3",
volume = "66",
pages = "371-391",
doi = "10.1515/soeu-2018-0029"
}
Pantović, L.. (2018). Not-So-Informal Relationships. Selective Unbundling of Maternal Care and the  Reconfigurations of Patient–Provider Relations in Serbia. in Südosteuropa. Journal of Politics and Society
De Gruyter., 66(3), 371-391.
https://doi.org/10.1515/soeu-2018-0029
Pantović L. Not-So-Informal Relationships. Selective Unbundling of Maternal Care and the  Reconfigurations of Patient–Provider Relations in Serbia. in Südosteuropa. Journal of Politics and Society. 2018;66(3):371-391.
doi:10.1515/soeu-2018-0029 .
Pantović, Ljiljana, "Not-So-Informal Relationships. Selective Unbundling of Maternal Care and the  Reconfigurations of Patient–Provider Relations in Serbia" in Südosteuropa. Journal of Politics and Society, 66, no. 3 (2018):371-391,
https://doi.org/10.1515/soeu-2018-0029 . .
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